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Logo: Institute of Meteorology and Climatology /Leibniz Universität Hannover
Logo Leibniz Universität Hannover
Logo: Institute of Meteorology and Climatology /Leibniz Universität Hannover
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Finished Projects

Research Projects

Model-based city planning and application in climate change (MOSAIK)

Bild zum Projekt Model-based city planning and application in climate change (MOSAIK)

Supervisor:

Björn Maronga, Günter Groß, Siegfried Raasch, Gunther Seckmeyer

Researcher:

Tobias Gronemeier, Matthias Sühring, Farah Kanani-Sühring, Jungwha Lee, Robert von Tils, Michael Schrempf

Duration:

2016-2019

Funded by:

BMBF

Brief description:

The goal of the project is the development of a new innovative urban climat model that is able to simulate the microclimate in densely-populated cities like Berlin with a spatial resolution of less than 10 m. The model will be developed as a user-friendly tool, which can be applied by both scientists and urban planners..

 

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HD(CP)2 (2nd phase): Flux heterogeneity and boundary layer circulations

Bild zum Projekt HD(CP)2 (2nd phase): Flux heterogeneity and boundary layer circulations

Supervisor:

Siegfried Raasch, Björn Maronga

Researcher:

Katrin Gehrke

Duration:

2016-2019

Funded by:

BMBF

Brief description:

In nature, atmospheric state variables are modified by surface flux variations at all scales, which are induced by dynamic (vegetation growth, land use management) surface heterogeneities, and which feedback on larger scale atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) fluxes. ABL circulations driven by these heterogeneities modify the surface fluxes resulting in two-way feedbacks and impacts on even extended circulations. Sub grid-scale heterogeneity of land surfaces in climate models is usually tackled by the tile approach, which assumes a homogeneous atmosphere interacting with a heterogeneous land surface. In this approximation, the atmosphere is solely driven by grid-averaged fluxes at the surface. This project will quantify the effect of climate model sub-grid flux variability including induced boundary circulations within the scale of the climate model grid cell and their feedbacks on the fluxes on the uncertainty of regional climate predictions. The main intention is to explicitly resolve the near-surface processes both in order to gain a better physical understanding, and to quantify errors in the existing weather forecasting model ICON surface parameterizations and suggest improvements.

 

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